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The Top Twenty Furniture

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What kind of furniture do you like the most? Wood Furniture...

What kind of furniture do you like the most? Wood Furniture Posted by on Apr 24, 2016
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Aug 11, 16
Home building instruction infographic

Home building instruction infographic [source: qarmazi.com]

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The Top Twenty Furniture

Jun 12, 16 The Top Twenty Furniture

Selected Top Chair and Recliner Design rated by 10makers and Cuddly Home Advisors

B&B Italia: Jeffrey Bernett’s Tulip swivel chair was part of the company’s impressive array of introductions at the Milan furniture fair. circle 303

Visopia: Aaron Rincover’s blue silicone gel light balls weigh a mere two pounds and are offered in battery-operated and cord versions. circle 316

colorful chair design

colorful chair design from bizchair

Archive: The West Coast company’s metallic pearl sheer created an air of mystery in the streets of cow-strewn Manhattan. circle 310

Original concept design of recliner chair selected through recliner reviews

Original concept design of recliner chair selected through recliner reviews

Christopher Farr: The company licensed Gunta Stolzl’s designs and reproduced a collection of dynamic and colorful rugs. circle 312

Zanotta: The material Techno-Gel, originally designed for the sneaker industry and available in clear, orange, or blue, created a buzz at the Milan furniture fair. Designer Werner Aisslinger used it in his Soft chaise. Available in the United States through M2L. circle 300

Sneaker industry materials

Sneaker industry materials

Elson & Company: Following a trip to Tibet in 1995, Diane Elson founded Elson & Company, a rug company dedicated to the art form of Tibetan weaving and modern design. San Francisco furniture designer Chris Balsa lent his expertise to the West coast rug company to create Passage. circle 304

Knoll Textiles: Suzanne Tick’s Imago, a hard-surface material that encapsulates fabric in an engineered resin, was the talk of NeoCon. circle 315

This is one of favorite recliner chair for outdoor

This is one of favorite recliner chair for outdoor

 

Biproduct: The Jb pendant is offered in white, orange, or natural waxed aluminum; it measures 6 an. in diameter and 11 in. high. circle 318

Light decor product

Light decor product

Creation Baumann: A slit in the delicate metallic fabric Planet reveals a blue resin vase from Troy. circle 307

metallic fabric

metallic fabric

UT: Originally created by Clarissa Richardson and Heidar Sadeki of the firm UT for the uptown Bliss Spa, the O series is now available through Totem. circle 309

Lees Commercial Carpets: Phase Two of the collaboration between Lees and designer Clodagh includes 10 new patterns in 16 colorways. Shown here is Zamora in gray, orange green, yellow, and wine. circle 314

Interior with gray, orange green, yellow, and wine

Interior with gray, orange green, yellow, and wine

MOM: Swiss industrial designer Willy Guhl’s Loop chair from 1954 has been redesigned from a single, self-supporting, asbestos-free fiber-cement band. circle 319

p10

Boffi: After opening a two-floor showroom in Manhattan, the company introduced a variety of new products, including the I Fiumi bowl sink designed by Claudio Silvestrin. circle 317

DesignLink: Jonas Lindvall’s stackable NOA molded plywood chair is offered in eight wood species. All species are farmed and no rainforest wood is used. circle 311

Wood chair design

Wood chair design

Maharam: The fashion-conscious textile company created the Spring 2000 Ready to Wear collection with the help of the same supplier as Gucci, Prada, and Jil Sander. circle 306

Wear collection

Wear collection

Tore Borgersen: Part of a consortium of Norwegian designers at the Milan furniture fair, young architect Tore Borgersen created the Dock Low lounge chair with a stainless-steel and laminated-plywood frame. circle 301

Chairs design by Milan furniture

Chairs design by Milan furniture

 

Sahco Hesslein/Bergamo: Lori Weitzner introduced 11 new patterns in the Bloom series, including Myrtle, a reversible matte sheer shown here. circle 313

Ligne Roset: Bianca, designed by Manuela Simonelli, is an occasional table/lamp with a white polycarbonate cover in a satin finish and a molded aluminum base. circle 308

Original ideas to design the best rocker recliner

Original ideas to design the best rocker recliner

 

Tucker Robbins: After more than 10 years of gathering and selling designs from other cultures, the designer introduced his own furniture collection called Tukuro. Included in the series is a bed made from 19th-century, hand-hewn tropical mountain pine. circle 305

Lamp design

Lamp design

 

METROPOLITAN

Simple bed design

Simple bed design

by stickley

For the name of the Stickley dealer nearest you, or to order a full-color catalog, call 315.682.5500. L. & J.G. Stickley, Inc., Stickley Drive, PO Box 480 Manlius, New York 13104-0480

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Summer’s Exhibition of Donald Judd Furniture

Jun 09, 16 Summer’s Exhibition of Donald Judd Furniture

Donald Judd Furniture

Organized with the Judd Foundation, the exhibition presented aluminum pieces by the minimalist sculptor, who began making furniture in the early 1970s. Meanwhile, the foundation itself installed similar tableaux at the nearby Mercer hotel. In both venues, pieces were shown for the first time as they might actually be used. Onetime objects on pedestals became, well, furniture.

summer's exhibition of Donald Judd furniture

summer’s exhibition of Donald Judd furniture

“It took me eight years to feel bold enough to do this,” says Madeleine Hoffmann, who was hired by the estate in 1994 and now heads its furniture division. “Before, people tended to think of Judd’s furniture as sculpture.” In a 1992 exhibition at A/D, a Judd bed was displayed without so much as a mattress. “People thought it was beautiful but said it couldn’t possibly be a bed. It looked too uncomfortable,” recalls Cunnick. This time, she added pillows and a blanket.

 furniture as sculpture

furniture as sculpture

At the height of ’90s minimalism, putting a blanket on a Judd bed–at least in public–was inconceivable. But 1992’s sacrilege is today compelling. “People have been very interested,” says Hoffmann, explaining the new approach from a marketing standpoint. The foundation hopes to increase income derived from furniture sales–to operate the Judd compound in Marfa, Texas, among other activities–and wants to reassure the otherwise intimidated that it’s indeed OK to put a mattress on a Judd bed and sleep on it. Judd presumably did the same.

Donald Judd Design

But what about that George Washington clock on Judd’s aluminum cabinet? We’re forced to acknowledge that he might very well have placed it there himself. Only a block from the Mercer, two from A/D, is a cast-iron building that he purchased as his home and studio in 1968. His foundation maintains the building largely as he left it, and passersby have come to expect the imposing Judd and Dan Flavin sculptures behind its street-level windows. What casual observers may not notice, however, is Judd’s seemingly out-of-place oak rolltop desk and armchair. And upstairs, accessible only by appointment, furniture he designed stands alongside Thonet chairs, a Victorian potbelly stove, and an Etruscan oil lamp. A Biedermeier settee occupies the bedroom, where an oriental rug adorns a Judd-designed table.

space and objects was enormously complex

space and objects was enormously complex

“His tastes were a lot broader than people think. He appreciated objects as achievements of their time, just as he thought that artists of his time should push forward, not mimic the past,” says the foundation’s art supervisor, Peter Ballantine. Judd’s minimalism is more strongly rooted in an abstract notion of integrity than in any particular aesthetic, so an Empire clock may be acceptable, whereas a derivative, Empire-style clock almost certainly wouldn’t. Of course, there’s no way of knowing for sure: Judd possessed a fastidiousness bordering on neurosis, and his thinking about space and objects was enormously complex. We can, however, be certain that he drew an inflexible distinction between art and design. When it came to the latter, he was somewhat of an eclectic. After all, this patron saint of minimalism hated being called a minimalist.

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Art and Furniture Business

Jun 02, 16 Art and Furniture Business

How did you make the huge leap from business to the art world?

I picked up some really good business skills at a management-consulting firm. It was when I volunteered to help the PBS station in Boston organize a benefit auction that I realized I had an eye for art–and that I could apply my skills to the art business. I moved to New York and took a job in fine-art publishing and consulting. After five years, I started consulting on my own.

The next leap was from art consultant to interior designer.

I’ve always been interested in interiors and architecture. It got frustrating when I would frame beautiful works of art and then deliver them to a space that didn’t deserve them. It was infuriating. Being the control freak that I am, I wanted more say about where my artists’ work “lived.”

Art work and interior design

Art work and interior design

How did the transition go?

l4

I found it challenging, but my first client was fantastic. If something went wrong or I wasn’t sure about something, he was really supportive.

l1

How did you draw other design clients?

It became a word-of-mouth thing. My art clients heard I was doing design and began hiring me for interiors. In the late 1990s, I started concentrating on lofts, which fit in with my aesthetic. Lofts are also perfect for displaying artwork: high ceilings, clean lines, and not a lot of moldings.

Can you characterize your aesthetic in art and design?

The art is abstract, minimal, sometimes geometric. Figurative, floral, and still life just aren’t my thing. The interiors are serene, functional, but very comfortable–neutral, but not without color. My favorite furniture is from Pucci, Donghia, and Holly Hunt.

Is your New York office more like an art gallery or an interiors studio?

My loft is a showroom and a gallery. Clients come to look at work and experience how to live with art. I rotate what’s on the walls, and I have an inventory of hundreds of works on paper. People can look at 500 pieces in an hour and a half. When they buy the art, they can have it framed here, delivered, and hung by my installer, whom I’ve worked with for years.

l2

Do the two aspects of your work influence each other?

Absolutely. Not that I match the art to the sofa. Sometimes I start a furniture plan and immediately think of a painting. It’s hard not to. But I really do focus on design first–art is the last piece.

What’s the hardest part of designing spaces for art?

Lighting always gets overlooked. Through my experience with corporate collections, I know where the display walls should be, but a lighting consultant is absolutely critical in getting it right.

Do you apply any other art-consulting lessons to your design work?

I learned early on, with framing, that it’s very important to be picky about your vendors. If you don’t have good ones, you’re nothing, no matter how relented you are.

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